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Projects

Leadreship in Action
Funded by British Lottery Fund ( Awards for All), European
Multicultural Foundation (EMF) completed a 3 days Leadershio in Action
Programme, recognised by the Institute of Leadership Mangement which
took plave on 26-27-28 June 2012.
The object was:
Understaning the concept of Leadership. Succesful deligates have been
recommendet for certificate from the Institute of Leadership and
Mangement.

Key note speakers were:
Bhupen Dave. Former Diredctor of Community Service for the Leicester
City Concil.
Currently Director of Europena Multicultural Foundation
Jiva Odera- Cheif Executive of Business Association (LABA)
Bala Thakrar- Director Asin Foundation for Phlanthropy ( AEP)




Raising Education Standards in Multicultural SocietyJointly held by Embassy of Finland, European Multicultural Foundation(EMF) and Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)Held on 22nd May 2012 at The Residence of the Ambassador of FinlandThe seminar was held in the delightful setting of the residence, andat the welcoming invitation of, the Ambassador to Finland, PekkaHuhtaniemi. Mr. Huhtaniemi became Ambassador in the FinnishEmbassy in Oslo in 2003 and then, in 2010 became Ambassador to the UKwhere he continues to serve.



Welcome Speech:The conference was opened at 11 a.m. with a welcome to the manyparticipants (see participants list attached) by the Ambassador.Ambassador Huhtaniemi, who began by telling the audience how Finlandhas attracted a great deal of interest from many other countries dueto its high educational and school standards confirmed by highrankings in international surveys both at primary and secondarylevels. There has been some suggestion that Finland has benefited inthis respect from what has been, historically, a relativelyhomogeneous population of its pupils, making learning easier totransmit from teachers to pupils.However, the Ambassador went on to point out that all our societiesare changing in this respect, including Finland, which will presentand expose the school system to novel challenges. This has been anissue already tackled for some time in many countries, Britain wasoffered as an example, spanning several decades. Mr. Huhtaniemisuggested there is room for mutual learning on how to organize amulticultural society in a multicultural classroom. This was to bethe theme of the seminar.The Ambassador then thanked the European Multicultural Foundation andDr. Tara Mukherjee in particular, for the collaboration in bringingthe seminar about. He also extended thanks to the speakers - AnnaMikander and Sirka Komulainen from Finland. He also added thanks toProfessor Trond Beravale for utilizing his network of contactsproducing such a high quality of invitees.He then asked President Halonen to deliver her Key Note Address. Theformer President has had an illustrious career, centrally in politicswhere she was elected to Parliament in 1979, to be re-elected fourtimes before becoming President of Finland. She has also a member ofthe Helsinki City Council for five terms and served in three Cabinetsin most Senior roles. Summary of Key Note Address:Ms Halonen in her key note address quoted her father's proverb "itis not onloy freedom but freedom and bread and not one or the other"- this sums up the importance of having sustainable goals to achievea sense of family in a multi-cultural society. She also stressed onthe need to not only prepare children to succeed in school life butalso prepare parents to help their children to succeed. She saidthat diversity makes Europe rich but how to find the richness is thequestion we now have to address. Multiculturalism in schools in Finland:Anna Mikander is senior adviser with the Ministry of Education andCulture in Finland and presented the first paper on "Multiculturalismin schools in Finland". Having explained the structure of theFinnish Education system Ms Mikander went on to discuss a gamut oftopics relating to education in Finland including questions of equalopportunities, comprehensiveness of education and competence ofteachers, student counseling and special support, encouragement inevaluation and self-assessment, flexibility and co-operation as wellas several others. She pointed out that about 4.6% of children inbasic education have a mother-tongue other than Finnish or Swedishwhich reflects the population as a whole. While Roma and Saame areminorities the majority of immigrants are Russian and Estonian. Whilechildren from immigrant backgrounds tend to choose vocationalsubjects the statistics do not suggest they are necessarily lowerperformers. Ms Mikander then went on to talk about preparatoryeducation for immigrant children with Finnish/Swedish as a secondlanguage in bot primary and secondary education.There are some opportunities to offer some instruction in theimmigrant children's mother-tongue (including the Roma and Saamepupils in some cases). The Saame pupils in the Homeland area have aright to have their entire education in their mother-tongue.The Speaker then went on to talk of a project to support developmentand establishment of multicultural skills spanning 4 years from 2007while the current Government programme provides that afternoon clubactivities will be a permanent part of the education system. Thesedevelopments are seen as opportunities to promote multiculturaleducation amongst pupils, teachers and related personnel. At the sametime there a revitalization initiative for the Saame while theNational Board of Education has played an important role in enhancingthe situation of education of the Roma people.New initiatives in both the Government Programme and the DevelopmentPlan for Education and Research (2011-2016) will be a way forwardsupporting, inter alia, reduction of poverty, inequality and socialexclusion. There is a focus on immigrants' participation in educationand training with emphasis on upper secondary, higher and adulteducation. It is clear the need for multicultural skills hasincreased and there is a conscious preparedness in the teachingprofession. The Impact of Immigration on Finnish parents' school choices inTurku:The paper given by Anna Mikander was followed by, Senior Researcher,Ms Sirkka Komulainen on the Impact of Immigration on Finnish parents'school choices in Turku.She began by reciting the Finnish families' school choices in Turku2010-2012. Ms Komulainen commented on funding by the Ministry ofEducation and Culture and urban segregation and question of equalityin education. There are 3 primary schools (7-12 year olds) with avarying number of immigrant pupils in each. A qualitative interviewwith experts was commissioned with 31 Finnish families. MsKomulainen made mention of what she termed White Flight - whitemiddle class families fleeing multicultural neighbourhoods andschools based on Seppanen in 2006, of evidence that the Educationsystem was seen to exacerbate social class divisions (as in Bourdieuin 1985) and scope for choice in Finland and Britain.She also referred to alternative theories such as those in Britainand Sweden of market-oriented, market-sceptic and market-ambivalentpositions (as in Bunar in 2009)`and also to counterintuitive schoolchoice (quoting James et al, 2010).After quoting statistics of the Turku population in 2011 includingpointing out that the total of foreign citizens in Finland was183,133 in 2011 and showing division of the Turku population in termsof nationality and language Ms Komulainen went on to discuss choiceof schools. In a couple of cases the number of immigrants wasrelevant. All chose the nearest school although there were the usualpractical reasons for choosing a particular school: safe walk;friends; avoiding a school run; nearest school was good enough;siblings at the same school etc. It seemed that families did not movehouse because of a particular school while language classes werepopular but not better.As far as neighbourhoods were concerned, Ms Komulainen considered howthey are deprived in Turku. She proposed that rational choice alonedid not explain housing decisions and it was clear that family lifeand housing history as well as housing provision mattered. Shequestioned whether rumours, in their turn, become self-fulfillingprophecies. Ms Komulainen also pointed out that with greateraffordable housing the capital city area showed up differently.There were persistent worries such as whether the Finnish child'sFinnish language and learning were adversely affected by the presenceof other languages in a multicultural classroom and do teachers fleeschools simply because of immigrants? The answer to both was No.In conclusion it seemed that Immigration had little impact on schoolchoices at primary school level although there are issues beneath thesurface. It will continue to be necessary to measure the outcomes onschool choices and there are implications on positive discriminationand housing policies. There is a final question: How to facilitatemore intercultural encounters. Tara Mukherjee Chairman of the European Multicultural Foundationwrapping up the morning session said, "Finland is one of the mostsocially equal countries, while Britain is one of the most unequal.In Britain, we need to raise awareness thru Education that culturaldiversity is a fact and the benefit of Multiculturalism is animportant prerequisite for a more equal society. Distributing KingJames Bibles to all the Secondary schools as proposed by theSecretary of State for Education is not the best way to promotesocial integration and certainly not going to be of any educationaluse." The above report was complied by Lena Choudary-Salter, Director ofMosaic Community Trust. The following article has been written in response to attending theabove Conference by Alan Marzo and can be found on The GlobalDiplomatic Forum website. Posted on -http://cts.vresp.com/c/?EuropeanMulitcultura/ec49f738dc/7916b71a52/c198e8d0f8/p=255May 24, 2012 by AlanMarzo -http://cts.vresp.com/c/?EuropeanMulitcultura/ec49f738dc/7916b71a52/4e2ecbb715/author=6 I attended an exclusive meeting on the 22nd of May at the residencyof the Finnish Ambassador in London, His Excellency Mr. PekkaHuthanen, to discuss the relationship between multiculturalism andthe education system. The analysis was made in a comparativeperspective between Finland and the United Kingdom. This event hadbeen made possible thanks to the collaboration of the EuropeanMulticultural Foundation, the Confederation of Indian Organisations,and the Finnish embassy in London. The list of the panellists included Her Excellency Tarja Halonen,President of Finland, a Senior adviser of the Finnish Ministry ofEducation, Anna Mikander, a Finnish academic from the Institute ofmigration of Turku University, Sirkka Komulainen and the Chairman ofEuropean Multicultural Foundation, Mr Tara Mukherjee. In additionsome of the Global Diplomatic Team took part to the debate, alongsidedifferent practitioners, academics and representatives from theglobal civil society. Her Excellency Madame Tarja Halonen opened the session by analysingthe new global challenges faced by our societies, asking for dynamicpolicies in the field of education. Among those, globalizationappears to her as the most important one; redefining the equationwith which policy makers need to cope, and asking for some newadequate and ingenious responses. In fact, according to the FinnishPresident, the societies are increasingly facing two types ofmigrations, one symbolized by a continuous rural exodus, and theother defined by the international migrations. In that dynamic, where the world is "becoming a village" according toHer Excellency, the states need to adapt themselves to these newsituations and produce new ways of integrating different people whileensuring they can keep and develop their own cultural diversity. Infact, the President has shown her conviction that this phenomenonshould be encouraged because of the high potential that individualsowning more than one language and culture represent for theircountries. Following this instructive talk about the benefits ofmulticulturalism for societies, Anna Mikander shared with theaudience the recipe of the Finnish success regarding its ability todrive what is considered as the best European education system.Thus, some of the features explaining the quality of the educationsystem in Finland and its method vis-À-vis issues related tostudents coming from a Finnish ethnic minority background and/or anon-Finnish culture have been explained. It has appeared that theFinnish strategy is articulated along two lines, respectively thereduction of social inequalities, and an attempt to decrease as muchas possible the barriers to education for non-Finnish or minoritygroups students, this through different tools such as ad hocindividual school monitoring and education of the students parents. Later, after the very interesting case study exposed by SirkkaKomulainen aiming to assess a potential link between areas populatedof immigrants and the outflow of Finnish born families from theseareas, correlation which proved to be negative, the audience and thepanellists took a lunch break together, where Karelian pies, atypical Finnish dish, were served and appreciated by the participantsof the conference-debate. The rest of the event was organized in a more interactive way, whereindividuals were free to share their point of view, remarks andquestions to the experts present that day. An analysis consideringthe United Kingdom situation came out several times and emphasisedthe scepticism vis-À-vis the current coalition government policy,which is seeking to privatize education, and which is more and moresympathetic to the idea of letting community groups organizingthemselves the education of their children. Thus, according to aconsiderable amount of stakeholders present in the audience, thissituation is susceptible to led place to a communitarian situation,where the society is divided, and where a continuous mutual suspicionis produced bringing to a real social "anomie". After a very interesting talk concerning the situation of the Roms inthe European Union by Mirabela Margelu, representative of theFrance-based association "La voix des Roms", his Excellency TaraMukherjee, Chairman of the European Multicultural Foundation, gave aspeech concluding a brilliant and productive day. In that dynamic, herepeated his faith in the possibility of constructing a realmulticultural society in the United Kingdom, with less socialinequalities, real hinderer of social cohesion and respect fordifferences according to him. Forward this message to a friend -http://oi.vresp.com/f2af/v4/send_to_friend.html?ch=ec49f738dc&lid=1600501539&ldh=7916b71a52 Iftikar AhmedLondon School of Islamics TrustHina BashirMiguel BenitoImmigrant-institutet SpainMME BeravaleMaria BiskopMinistry of Education and Culture, FinlandBoza BolcinaLjudska Universa AjdovŠčina (Slovenia)SeÁn BrackenUniversity of WorcesterAnne CanningLondon Borough of Tower Hamlet (Assistant Director)Kirti ChandaranaLena Choudary SalterMosaic Community TrustAnna CrispinChief Education OfficerLondon Borough of HillingdonGill CrozierDepartment of Education Roehampton University (Professor)Bhupen DaveEuropean Multicultural Foundation (Director)Kirtibhai DoshiPaulette DouglasCommunity Empower Network (Education Advocate)Simon ElliottForest Gate Community School (Head Teacher)Younes El GhaziGlobal Diplomatic ForumLeonie EzziEuropean Multicultural FoundationDon FlynnMigrants Rights Network (Director)Jeanne GamonetFederation of Romani and Traveller Women (France)Radmila GoŠovicLjeŠka 80, 11000 Belgrade SerbiaIrena Gunter GodinaEuropean Multicultural Foundation (France)Tarja HalonenImmediate Retiring President, FinlandElli HeikkilÂInstitute of Migration, Finland (Research Director)Carolyn HerbertWestminster City Council (BME Inclusion Consultant)Mahendra HiraniMultifaithsPekka HuhtaniemiAmbassador of FinlandHigh Priestess IfayorisuIleto Carribbean People's NetworkDominik Jackson-ColeUniversity of CambridgeYamini JarvisDipak JoshiConfederation of Indian Organisations (UK)Trevas KnightBlack Education Black ArtOlavi KoivukangasEuropean Multicultural Foundation (Finland)Vinod KotechaEuropean Multicultural Foundation (Treasurer)Annette LawsonNAWO (Chair)Metka LokarSlovenian Migration Institute (Slovenia)Pravin LukkaConfederation of Indian Organisations (UK) Deputy PresidentAlan MarzoGlobal Diplomatic ForumTony MasonMirabela MergeluCo-ordinator for Roma AffairsSatya MinhasMultifaithsNasrullah Khan MoghalManchester Council for Community RelationsJo Moran-EllisDepartment of Sociology, University of Surrey (Head of Department)Tara MukherjeeEuropean Multicultural Foundation (Chairman)Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK) PresidentTerry NoelBT Melodians Steel OrchestraNarendra PandyaSunita ParmarJagdish PatelConfederation of Indian Organisations (UK)Krutika PauChildren and Family LB Brent (Director)Amin PravinConfederation of Indian Organisations (UK)Clive SentanceKing's Norton Boys' SchoolPeter SimkovicAnnwin, SlovakiaEuropean Multicultural Foundation (Secretary General)Gurmel SinghLeicester Multicultural AssociationKenasue SmartCaribbean People's NetworkFrances StaintonMayor, London Borough Hammersmith and FulhamMÁria Vass-SalazarEmbassy of Hungary (Deputy Head Mission)Eleni VelonikiGlobal Diplomatic ForumOlagi VerveriLiverpool Hope UniversityHarendra VyasConfederation of Indian Organisations (UK)Yvette WalcottBT Melodians Steel OrchestraSteffano WeynbergerEmbassy of GermanyTingting YuanLiverpool Hope UniversityAyaz ZubeiriGlobal Diplomatic Forum "This is fantastic. It gives living examples of the successes of verymany people over the last 4 decades!Well Done." KhanN Khan Moghal MBEChief ExecutiveMCCR - Manchester Council for Community Relations

REPORT ON SEMINAR ON:
Raising Education Standards in Multicultural Society
Jointly held by Embassy of Finland, European Multicultural Foundation
(EMF) and Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)
Held on 22nd May 2012 at The Residence of the Ambassador of Finland
The seminar was held in the delightful setting of the residence, and
at the welcoming invitation of, the Ambassador to Finland, Pekka
Huhtaniemi. Mr. Huhtaniemi became Ambassador in the Finnish
Embassy in Oslo in 2003 and then, in 2010 became Ambassador to the UK
where he continues to serve.

Welcome Speech:
The conference was opened at 11 a.m. with a welcome to the many
participants (see participants list attached) by the Ambassador.
Ambassador Huhtaniemi, who began by telling the audience how Finland
has attracted a great deal of interest from many other countries due
to its high educational and school standards confirmed by high
rankings in international surveys both at primary and secondary
levels. There has been some suggestion that Finland has benefited in
this respect from what has been, historically, a relatively
homogeneous population of its pupils, making learning easier to
transmit from teachers to pupils.
However, the Ambassador went on to point out that all our societies
are changing in this respect, including Finland, which will present
and expose the school system to novel challenges. This has been an
issue already tackled for some time in many countries, Britain was
offered as an example, spanning several decades. Mr. Huhtaniemi
suggested there is room for mutual learning on how to organize a
multicultural society in a multicultural classroom. This was to be
the theme of the seminar.
The Ambassador then thanked the European Multicultural Foundation and
Dr. Tara Mukherjee in particular, for the collaboration in bringing
the seminar about. He also extended thanks to the speakers - Anna
Mikander and Sirka Komulainen from Finland. He also added thanks to
Professor Trond Beravale for utilizing his network of contacts
producing such a high quality of invitees.
He then asked President Halonen to deliver her Key Note Address. The
former President has had an illustrious career, centrally in politics
where she was elected to Parliament in 1979, to be re-elected four
times before becoming President of Finland. She has also a member of
the Helsinki City Council for five terms and served in three Cabinets
in most Senior roles.

Summary of Key Note Address:
Ms Halonen in her key note address quoted her father's proverb "it
is not onloy freedom but freedom and bread and not one or the other"
- this sums up the importance of having sustainable goals to achieve
a sense of family in a multi-cultural society. She also stressed on
the need to not only prepare children to succeed in school life but
also prepare parents to help their children to succeed. She said
that diversity makes Europe rich but how to find the richness is the
question we now have to address.

Multiculturalism in schools in Finland:
Anna Mikander is senior adviser with the Ministry of Education and
Culture in Finland and presented the first paper on "Multiculturalism
in schools in Finland". Having explained the structure of the
Finnish Education system Ms Mikander went on to discuss a gamut of
topics relating to education in Finland including questions of equal
opportunities, comprehensiveness of education and competence of
teachers, student counseling and special support, encouragement in
evaluation and self-assessment, flexibility and co-operation as well
as several others. She pointed out that about 4.6% of children in
basic education have a mother-tongue other than Finnish or Swedish
which reflects the population as a whole. While Roma and Saame are
minorities the majority of immigrants are Russian and Estonian. While
children from immigrant backgrounds tend to choose vocational
subjects the statistics do not suggest they are necessarily lower
performers. Ms Mikander then went on to talk about preparatory
education for immigrant children with Finnish/Swedish as a second
language in bot primary and secondary education.
There are some opportunities to offer some instruction in the
immigrant children's mother-tongue (including the Roma and Saame
pupils in some cases). The Saame pupils in the Homeland area have a
right to have their entire education in their mother-tongue.
The Speaker then went on to talk of a project to support development
and establishment of multicultural skills spanning 4 years from 2007
while the current Government programme provides that afternoon club
activities will be a permanent part of the education system. These
developments are seen as opportunities to promote multicultural
education amongst pupils, teachers and related personnel. At the same
time there a revitalization initiative for the Saame while the
National Board of Education has played an important role in enhancing
the situation of education of the Roma people.
New initiatives in both the Government Programme and the Development
Plan for Education and Research (2011-2016) will be a way forward
supporting, inter alia, reduction of poverty, inequality and social
exclusion. There is a focus on immigrants' participation in education
and training with emphasis on upper secondary, higher and adult
education. It is clear the need for multicultural skills has
increased and there is a conscious preparedness in the teaching
profession.

The Impact of Immigration on Finnish parents' school choices in
Turku:
The paper given by Anna Mikander was followed by, Senior Researcher,
Ms Sirkka Komulainen on the Impact of Immigration on Finnish parents'
school choices in Turku.
She began by reciting the Finnish families' school choices in Turku
2010-2012. Ms Komulainen commented on funding by the Ministry of
Education and Culture and urban segregation and question of equality
in education. There are 3 primary schools (7-12 year olds) with a
varying number of immigrant pupils in each. A qualitative interview
with experts was commissioned with 31 Finnish families. Ms
Komulainen made mention of what she termed White Flight - white
middle class families fleeing multicultural neighbourhoods and
schools based on Seppanen in 2006, of evidence that the Education
system was seen to exacerbate social class divisions (as in Bourdieu
in 1985) and scope for choice in Finland and Britain.
She also referred to alternative theories such as those in Britain
and Sweden of market-oriented, market-sceptic and market-ambivalent
positions (as in Bunar in 2009)`and also to counterintuitive school
choice (quoting James et al, 2010).
After quoting statistics of the Turku population in 2011 including
pointing out that the total of foreign citizens in Finland was
183,133 in 2011 and showing division of the Turku population in terms
of nationality and language Ms Komulainen went on to discuss choice
of schools. In a couple of cases the number of immigrants was
relevant. All chose the nearest school although there were the usual
practical reasons for choosing a particular school: safe walk;
friends; avoiding a school run; nearest school was good enough;
siblings at the same school etc. It seemed that families did not move
house because of a particular school while language classes were
popular but not better.
As far as neighbourhoods were concerned, Ms Komulainen considered how
they are deprived in Turku. She proposed that rational choice alone
did not explain housing decisions and it was clear that family life
and housing history as well as housing provision mattered. She
questioned whether rumours, in their turn, become self-fulfilling
prophecies. Ms Komulainen also pointed out that with greater
affordable housing the capital city area showed up differently.
There were persistent worries such as whether the Finnish child's
Finnish language and learning were adversely affected by the presence
of other languages in a multicultural classroom and do teachers flee
schools simply because of immigrants? The answer to both was No.
In conclusion it seemed that Immigration had little impact on school
choices at primary school level although there are issues beneath the
surface. It will continue to be necessary to measure the outcomes on
school choices and there are implications on positive discrimination
and housing policies. There is a final question: How to facilitate
more intercultural encounters.

Tara Mukherjee Chairman of the European Multicultural Foundation
wrapping up the morning session said, "Finland is one of the most
socially equal countries, while Britain is one of the most unequal.
In Britain, we need to raise awareness thru Education that cultural
diversity is a fact and the benefit of Multiculturalism is an
important prerequisite for a more equal society. Distributing King
James Bibles to all the Secondary schools as proposed by the
Secretary of State for Education is not the best way to promote
social integration and certainly not going to be of any educational
use."

The above report was complied by Lena Choudary-Salter, Director of
Mosaic Community Trust.

The following article has been written in response to attending the
above Conference by Alan Marzo and can be found on The Global
Diplomatic Forum website.

Posted on -
http://cts.vresp.com/c/?EuropeanMulitcultura/ec49f738dc/7916b71a52/c198e8d0f8/p=255
May 24, 2012 by AlanMarzo -
http://cts.vresp.com/c/?EuropeanMulitcultura/ec49f738dc/7916b71a52/4e2ecbb715/author=6

I attended an exclusive meeting on the 22nd of May at the residency
of the Finnish Ambassador in London, His Excellency Mr. Pekka
Huthanen, to discuss the relationship between multiculturalism and
the education system. The analysis was made in a comparative
perspective between Finland and the United Kingdom. This event had
been made possible thanks to the collaboration of the European
Multicultural Foundation, the Confederation of Indian Organisations,
and the Finnish embassy in London.

The list of the panellists included Her Excellency Tarja Halonen,
President of Finland, a Senior adviser of the Finnish Ministry of
Education, Anna Mikander, a Finnish academic from the Institute of
migration of Turku University, Sirkka Komulainen and the Chairman of
European Multicultural Foundation, Mr Tara Mukherjee. In addition
some of the Global Diplomatic Team took part to the debate, alongside
different practitioners, academics and representatives from the
global civil society.

Her Excellency Madame Tarja Halonen opened the session by analysing
the new global challenges faced by our societies, asking for dynamic
policies in the field of education. Among those, globalization
appears to her as the most important one; redefining the equation
with which policy makers need to cope, and asking for some new
adequate and ingenious responses. In fact, according to the Finnish
President, the societies are increasingly facing two types of
migrations, one symbolized by a continuous rural exodus, and the
other defined by the international migrations.

In that dynamic, where the world is "becoming a village" according to
Her Excellency, the states need to adapt themselves to these new
situations and produce new ways of integrating different people while
ensuring they can keep and develop their own cultural diversity. In
fact, the President has shown her conviction that this phenomenon
should be encouraged because of the high potential that individuals
owning more than one language and culture represent for their
countries.

Following this instructive talk about the benefits of
multiculturalism for societies, Anna Mikander shared with the
audience the recipe of the Finnish success regarding its ability to
drive what is considered as the best European education system.
Thus, some of the features explaining the quality of the education
system in Finland and its method vis-À-vis issues related to
students coming from a Finnish ethnic minority background and/or a
non-Finnish culture have been explained. It has appeared that the
Finnish strategy is articulated along two lines, respectively the
reduction of social inequalities, and an attempt to decrease as much
as possible the barriers to education for non-Finnish or minority
groups students, this through different tools such as ad hoc
individual school monitoring and education of the students parents.

Later, after the very interesting case study exposed by Sirkka
Komulainen aiming to assess a potential link between areas populated
of immigrants and the outflow of Finnish born families from these
areas, correlation which proved to be negative, the audience and the
panellists took a lunch break together, where Karelian pies, a
typical Finnish dish, were served and appreciated by the participants
of the conference-debate.

The rest of the event was organized in a more interactive way, where
individuals were free to share their point of view, remarks and
questions to the experts present that day. An analysis considering
the United Kingdom situation came out several times and emphasised
the scepticism vis-À-vis the current coalition government policy,
which is seeking to privatize education, and which is more and more
sympathetic to the idea of letting community groups organizing
themselves the education of their children. Thus, according to a
considerable amount of stakeholders present in the audience, this
situation is susceptible to led place to a communitarian situation,
where the society is divided, and where a continuous mutual suspicion
is produced bringing to a real social "anomie".

After a very interesting talk concerning the situation of the Roms in
the European Union by Mirabela Margelu, representative of the
France-based association "La voix des Roms", his Excellency Tara
Mukherjee, Chairman of the European Multicultural Foundation, gave a
speech concluding a brilliant and productive day. In that dynamic, he
repeated his faith in the possibility of constructing a real
multicultural society in the United Kingdom, with less social
inequalities, real hinderer of social cohesion and respect for
differences according to him.

Forward this message to a friend -
http://oi.vresp.com/f2af/v4/send_to_friend.html?ch=ec49f738dc&lid=1600501539&ldh=7916b71a52

Iftikar Ahmed
London School of Islamics Trust
Hina Bashir
Miguel Benito
Immigrant-institutet Spain
MME Beravale
Maria Biskop
Ministry of Education and Culture, Finland
Boza Bolcina
Ljudska Universa AjdovŠčina (Slovenia)
SeÁn Bracken
University of Worcester
Anne Canning
London Borough of Tower Hamlet (Assistant Director)
Kirti Chandarana
Lena Choudary Salter
Mosaic Community Trust
Anna Crispin
Chief Education Officer
London Borough of Hillingdon
Gill Crozier
Department of Education Roehampton University (Professor)
Bhupen Dave
European Multicultural Foundation (Director)
Kirtibhai Doshi
Paulette Douglas
Community Empower Network (Education Advocate)
Simon Elliott
Forest Gate Community School (Head Teacher)
Younes El Ghazi
Global Diplomatic Forum
Leonie Ezzi
European Multicultural Foundation
Don Flynn
Migrants Rights Network (Director)
Jeanne Gamonet
Federation of Romani and Traveller Women (France)
Radmila GoŠovic
LjeŠka 80, 11000 Belgrade Serbia
Irena Gunter Godina
European Multicultural Foundation (France)
Tarja Halonen
Immediate Retiring President, Finland
Elli HeikkilÂ
Institute of Migration, Finland (Research Director)
Carolyn Herbert
Westminster City Council (BME Inclusion Consultant)
Mahendra Hirani
Multifaiths
Pekka Huhtaniemi
Ambassador of Finland
High Priestess Ifayorisu
Ileto Carribbean People's Network
Dominik Jackson-Cole
University of Cambridge
Yamini Jarvis
Dipak Joshi
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)
Trevas Knight
Black Education Black Art
Olavi Koivukangas
European Multicultural Foundation (Finland)
Vinod Kotecha
European Multicultural Foundation (Treasurer)
Annette Lawson
NAWO (Chair)
Metka Lokar
Slovenian Migration Institute (Slovenia)
Pravin Lukka
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK) Deputy President
Alan Marzo
Global Diplomatic Forum
Tony Mason
Mirabela Mergelu
Co-ordinator for Roma Affairs
Satya Minhas
Multifaiths
Nasrullah Khan Moghal
Manchester Council for Community Relations
Jo Moran-Ellis
Department of Sociology, University of Surrey (Head of Department)
Tara Mukherjee
European Multicultural Foundation (Chairman)
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK) President
Terry Noel
BT Melodians Steel Orchestra
Narendra Pandya
Sunita Parmar
Jagdish Patel
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)
Krutika Pau
Children and Family LB Brent (Director)
Amin Pravin
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)
Clive Sentance
King's Norton Boys' School
Peter Simkovic
Annwin, Slovakia
European Multicultural Foundation (Secretary General)
Gurmel Singh
Leicester Multicultural Association
Kenasue Smart
Caribbean People's Network
Frances Stainton
Mayor, London Borough Hammersmith and Fulham
MÁria Vass-Salazar
Embassy of Hungary (Deputy Head Mission)
Eleni Veloniki
Global Diplomatic Forum
Olagi Ververi
Liverpool Hope University
Harendra Vyas
Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK)
Yvette Walcott
BT Melodians Steel Orchestra
Steffano Weynberger
Embassy of Germany
Tingting Yuan
Liverpool Hope University
Ayaz Zubeiri
Global Diplomatic Forum

"This is fantastic. It gives living examples of the successes of very
many people over the last 4 decades!
Well Done."

Khan
N Khan Moghal MBE
Chief Executive
MCCR - Manchester Council for Community Relations

EMF is fulfilling its aims through various projects and activities:

2004:
Slovakia - part of a Multicultural Europe in partnership with ANNWIN (Slovakia) and CFOR (UK)

2005:
Social Inclusion in Action in partnership of 7 organisations from 6 European countries (EU Grundtvig project)
VIP-School in partnership of 4 partners from 4 European countries (EU INTI project)

2006:
Social Inclusion in Action in partnership of 7 organisations from 6 European countries (EU Grundtvig project)
TANDEM – Mentoring and Vocational Assistance for Migrant Youth in partnership of 6 partners from 6 European countries (EU INTI project)

2007:
Europe Matters - Europe Works, a week-long international seminar, that focused on building equal opportunities, understanding among diverse communities of various nationalities, ethnicities and cultures, race, sexual orientation, religion, disability, social status and other issues in Europe.

2009:
Highlighting Race Relations. London.

2010:
Equality & Human Rights Act. Leicester, Nottingham & Wellingborough.

2011:
A Common Immigration Policy, Freedom of Movement of E.U Citizens within the EU Member States and the Plight of the Roma Community, London.

2012:
Raising Education standards in a Multicultural Society.
A Half Day Seminar jointly held with the Embassy of Finland and Confederation of Indian Organisations (UK). At the Residence of the Embassador of Finland. London.
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